The Most Frequently Asked Questions We Get About International Health Insurance

I’m a legal U.S. Resident but not a citizen. My job doesn’t offer health benefits. What can I do?

We can get you health coverage! Legal U.S. Residents have the same eligibility as citizens to receive coverage through the ACA, along with income-based subsidies. Another great option we offer is short-term health insurance, which is great for those who are still unable to afford an ACA-compliant plan.

I live in another country right now but we don’t have health insurance for the time we’re back in the states. What kind of insurance can we get?

The fantastic news is that E&M Global Insurance offers insurance plans customized for YOU! Whether you were born outside of the U.S., we offer unique, affordable, worldwide coverage specially designed for those who work and live abroad. This long-term global insurance has some great perks like: PPO insurance, no policy expiration date, no special enrollment period, applicants can receive approval within 24 hours, and coverage begins immediately. You also don’t nee da U.S. Visa or Social Security Number. Wether you are traveling for a few months or a few days, we can make sure you’re covered during travel, stay and return.

Will my pre-existing medical conditions be covered by my international health insurance plan?

Well, the short answer is — every application is different. International health insurance plans typically have an underwriter working for the insurance company review your medical history and determine whether or not they can insure you. Either they will approve the application as is, limit or exclude the pre-existing condition, or add a premium to cover the additional risks associated with the pre-existing conditions. Or they may simply deny the policy. At E&M, we take extra care to ensure our clients receive not just health insurance, but the best possible health coverage to suit their needs.

I’m at risk of becoming a public charge. What are my options?

If you’re at risk of denial under the DHS public charge rule, a perfect solution to avoid public charge is Short-Term Medical Insurance. There is no open enrollment period (you can apply at any time), and most plans can last anywhere from one month up to thirty-six months. Although these plans do not cover pre-existing conditions, immigrations considers these plans “positively” when using the public charge test.

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