Vaccine Booster Shots Are Underway — Here’s How To Figure Out If You Need One

 

You were one of the early individuals who were vaccinated, and now, you’re not sure whether or not you should get a booster. And the differing medical options from experts aren’t helping much — should it be every six months or eight months? Should you stick with the same vaccine — as in, if you originally had Pfizer, should you get the Pfizer booster? So many questions — how do we navigate through the information?

The back and forth of booster shots began last month when the Whit House’s chief medical advisor suggested booster shots for all adults about eight months after their initial course of vaccination. However, a couple of weeks ago, scientists from the FDA pushed a review outlining that boosters for the general public were not needed at this time. The FDA did authorize the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine booster only for certain adults — those over 65 and others who are high risk of contracting severe Covid-19 — at least six months after their last dose.

After much debate, the CDC backed this plan and spelled out in more detail who should get the shot and who may only want to consider getting one.

Who needs boosters most urgently?

If you’re immunocompromised or can’t mount a strong immune response to the vaccine, you would need a third short of the mRNA vaccines to protect against severe disease or hospitalization. 

Also, if you are over the age of 65, both the FDA and the CDC recommend this age back receive boosters. Several studies have shown that for older people, protection against severe Covid-19 wanes over time, along with its efficacy.

What about people with underlying conditions?

Since the FDA approved the Pfizer booster for anyone “at high risk of severe Covid-19”, those with underlying conditions like diabetes or chronic lung disease would be recommended.

I’m healthy and young (under 65), do I need a booster right now? I’m worried about the Delta variant and want the best protection.

With the scare of the Delta variant and the mixed messages about boosters, some younger, healthy individuals may be tempted to see if they can get a booster — in fact, some are already doing so. Here’s the lowdown: scientists recommend a booster shot when there’s convincing evidence that the initial doses of the vaccine don’t offer enough protection. And interestingly enough, several studies have recently shown that for the mRNA vaccines, the opposite has proven true for healthy adults. The vaccines are actually still working quite well, even against the delta variant.

Bottom line? Two doses of the mRNA vaccines are still working as intended. If you are one with underlying conditions or over the age of 65 and aren’t sure if you should get one, then give us a call! We can help you, make sure it’s covered under your health insurance plan, and help you with any of your other insurance needs! We’re the number one health insurance agency in Coral Springs and Parkland for a reason!

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